Difference between revisions of "Bdisp EnableColor"

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| parameters =
 
| parameters =
 
* '''n''': 0 to disable full color, 1 to enable full color.
 
* '''n''': 0 to disable full color, 1 to enable full color.
| comments = Most of the time, the OS works with the indexed color mode to reduce memory requirements and increase speed. Exceptions include the main menu, whenever a g3p picture is displayed, and screens with a theme-related background like the eActivity file browser. Most custom add-ins work always in full color mode regardless of needing any color other than the eight indexed ones - this is a often forgotten [[Optimization_Tips|optimization]] tip.
+
| comments = One can switch between the two color modes as needed, not just when an add-in starts.
 +
 
 +
Most of the time, the OS works with the indexed color mode to reduce memory requirements and increase speed. Exceptions include the main menu, whenever a g3p picture is displayed, and screens with a theme-related background like the eActivity file browser. Most custom add-ins work always in full color mode regardless of needing any color other than the eight indexed ones - this is a often forgotten [[Optimization_Tips|optimization]] tip.
 
}}
 
}}

Revision as of 19:06, 30 July 2014


Synopsis

Header: fxcg/display.h
Syscall index: 0x0921
Function signature: void Bdisp_EnableColor(int n)

Switches the screen between full color mode (16 bits per pixel, RGB565) and indexed color mode (3 bits per pixel, 8 colors - the same that can be used with PrintXY).

Parameters

  • n: 0 to disable full color, 1 to enable full color.

Comments

One can switch between the two color modes as needed, not just when an add-in starts.

Most of the time, the OS works with the indexed color mode to reduce memory requirements and increase speed. Exceptions include the main menu, whenever a g3p picture is displayed, and screens with a theme-related background like the eActivity file browser. Most custom add-ins work always in full color mode regardless of needing any color other than the eight indexed ones - this is a often forgotten optimization tip.